The Power of Prose

I am a sucker for good writing. That might sound obvious, but it’s not always easy to find. When I do, I feel transformed. Or maybe I should say transfused, like I have just received a fresh flow of blood to my brain.

According to an article in The New York Times on Sunday, Your Brain on Fiction by Annie Murphy Paul, there’s some truth to that. “Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life,” Paul wrote.

This explains my excitement over the weekend while reading Why Be Happy When You Could be Normal? Jeanette Winterson’s stunning new memoir. The second chapter of the book starts, “I was born in Manchester in 1959. It was a good place to be born.”  Those two simple sentences lead into one of the most provocative where-we-come-from-shapes-who-we-are descriptions I have ever read. I didn’t think I cared about Manchester. I’m not sure I even know where it is. (Click here to find Manchester.) I do now.

Winterson’s childhood as grim and dysfunctional as any of the other best-selling memoirs —The Glass Castle, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, or The Liar’s Club—is breathtaking not only because of the author’s hopeful and resilient spirit but because of the way she tells her tale. Each sentence is clear, simple, and yet replete.

Or, to borrow a phrase from my friend Constance Hale’s must-read series on writing for The New York Times, each sentence is a “mini-narrative”. Which means by the end of this detailed, evocative, and emotional book, I should have one stimulated brain.

How exciting.

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4 Responses to The Power of Prose

  1. Nice post. I really like Jeanette Winterson, although I’ve not come across her memoir before. What a great title. I’ll have to put it on my list for 2013, when I’ve finished reading the world…

  2. Martha Bebinger says:

    Very nice Sarah. I expect you will be exploding with energy by the time I see you on Wed.

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